The Map of Connections 3.1



During many surveys I discovered that the Irish Border is often perforated. Gates are set in hedgerows for the convenience of farmers, stepping stones and community-built bridges span rivers, walkers’ routes and muddy by-ways go wherever they please. These kinds of connections have always been there, although I think it is fair to say that their numbers have increased during the Peace Process. Roads blocked or cratered during the Troubles are being re-connected at a rate too fast for the Ordnance Survey to keep up with. On the local level cross-border movement is quietly happening. It has been unmapped, until now.


Detail from The Map of Connections 3.1


Detail from The Map of Connections 3.1

The Map of Connections 3.1 is 60 x 85 cm. This is a C-Type print on matt paper.

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Fictional Ulster



If you spend a few hours reading about a fictional place, doesn’t it become as real as places that actually exist? Perhaps more real? Ballybeg, the fictitious setting for Brian Friel’s plays, is more famous than most real villages in Ulster. Despite not existing, the village has taken on a geographic life.

This map covers the nine counties of Ulster, locating fictional places invented by writers. I attempted to make a map that is entertaining and intriguing but that might also offer an insight into how we see ourselves and how others see us.

The Map of Connections Detail 1
Detail from Fictional Ulster

The Map of Connections Detail 2
Detail from Fictional Ulster

The Map of Connections Detail 2
Detail from Fictional Ulster

Fictional Ulster is 50 x 60 cm and is a giclée print, an inkjet technique using fade-resistant, pigment-based archival inks.

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A View of the Border

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This is the map that illustrates The Rule of the Land: Walking Ireland's Border. It looks at how power is expressed on a landscape. Defensive architecture along the border is charted: walls, forts, gun placements, but much else besides. Power comes in many forms and not all of them are so obvious.

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Detail from A View of the Border

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Detail from A View of the Border

A View of the Border is 70 x 78 cm and is a giclée print, an inkjet technique using fade-resistant, pigment-based archival inks.

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